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On This Day In History | 1934

November 17, 2014
The '34 Blue & White gridders

The ’34 Blue & White gridders

On this day 80 years ago, the football team capped a 4-2-1 season with a 45-0 win over Flatbush.

Julius Ward began the scoring for the Blue and White, plunging in from the one-yard line after John Cather caught a long pass to set up the tally. The next touchdown came courtesy of Everett Welch who punctuated a sixty-yard drive by carrying it over for the score as the Brook took a comfortable lead into the half.

Early in the third quarter, luck shined on the blues when Welch fumbled his punt attempt, only to pick it up and run sixty yards for a back-breaking score. A touchdown by Ivor Peterson closed the period, but there was plenty of offense left in the final period of the season.

Captain Alfred Van Ranst would close his case for that season’s Vanderveer Trophy with three touchdowns, one on a carry and the two others on passes from Swede Johnson. While Van Ranst’s days on Fitch Field were over after this game, his football career was far from finished. He starred for the Cornell University Big Red, earning All-America honors in 1937. In 1938 he was named the team captain and finished the year as the squad’s Most Valuable Player. Additionally, he was a force for the track team, setting the school’s shot put record and finishing 3rd at the Ivy League Championships in 1938. In honor of his accomplishments, he was inducted into the Cornell Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989.

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